Do you want to read outside your comfort zone in 2019?  Take Book Riot’s Read Harder Challenge—a list of 24 categories of books that you may not have read before.  To keep you motivated, we’ll feature one of the categories each week in the e-newsletter along with suggestions from our collection and beyond.  We’re going to feature the categories in order of how they appear on the list, but feel free to tackle the them in any order you like!  For the full list from Book Riot, click here.

A book in which an animal or inanimate object is a point-of-view character

Watership Down by Richard Adams

An allegorical tale of survival in which a band of wild rabbits leave their ancestral home to build a more humane society.

My Name is Red by Orhan Pamuk

A furor erupts in sixteenth-century Istanbul when the Sultan commissions the European-style illumination of a great book, and the situation worsens when one of the miniaturists vanishes mysteriously.

WE3 by Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely

Writer Grant Morrison and artist Frank Quitely deliver the emotional journey of WE3 – three house pets weaponized for lethal combat by the government – as they search for “home” and ward off the shadowy agency that created them.

The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein

Nearing the end of his life, Enzo, a dog with a philosopher’s soul, tries to bring together the family, pulled apart by a three year custody battle between daughter Zoe’s maternal grandparents and her father Denny, a race car driver.

Black Beauty by Anna Sewell

Presents the classic tale of a horse’s unenviable life in late Victorian England, straight from the horse’s mouth.

The Collector Collector by Tibor Fischer

The hero of Tibor Fischer’s tale is an antique bowl that comes into the possession of a lovelorn, young London art appraiser named Rosa. Rosa’s bowl is no ordinary piece of clay, however: it is a ceramic sage, an urn of uncommon erudition that has witnessed all of history’s major convulsions–revolutions, famines, massacres, wars–and has survived more than four hundred breakages and three thousand thefts.

The Fur Person by May Sarton

This enchanting story and classic of cat literature is drawn from the true adventures of Tom Jones, May Sarton’s own cat. Prior to making the author’s acquaintance, he is a fiercely independent, nameless Cat About Town. Growing tired of his vagabond lifestyle, however, he concludes that there might be some appeal in giving up his freedom for a home. Finally, a house materializes that does seem acceptable and so do the voices that inhabit it. It is here that he begins his transformation into a genuine Fur Person.

Fox 8 by George Saunders

Idealistic Fox 8’s ability to communicate in “Yuman” cannot save his pack when their den and food supply are destroyed to build a mall, so he writes a letter asking for an explanation of human’s cruelty.

 

Happy Reading!