Are you looking for a challenge this summer?  Check out our weekly reading lists, inspired by this list from Bookish.  To keep you motivated, we’ll feature one of the categories each week in the e-newsletter along with suggestions from our collection.   Happy Reading!

A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin (Dothraki)

 The kingdom of the royal Stark family faces its ultimate challenge in the onset of a generation-long winter, the poisonous plots of the rival Lannisters, the emergence of the Neverborn demons, and the arrival of barbarian hordes.

Dune by Frank Herbert (Fremen)

Arrakis is the sole source of Melange, the “spice of spices.” Melange is necessary for interstellar travel and grants psychic powers and longevity, so whoever controls it wields great influence. The troubles begin when stewardship of Arrakis is transferred by the Emperor from the Harkonnen Noble House to House Atreides. The Harkonnens don’t want to give up their privilege, though, and through sabotage and treachery they cast young Duke Paul Atreides out into the planet’s harsh environment to die. There he falls in with the Fremen, a tribe of desert dwellers who become the basis of the army with which he will reclaim what’s rightfully his.

Watership Down by Richard Adams (Lapine)

Set in England’s Downs, a once idyllic rural landscape, this stirring tale of adventure, courage and survival follows a band of very special creatures on their flight from the intrusion of man and the certain destruction of their home. Led by a stouthearted pair of friends, they journey forth from their native Sandleford Warren through the harrowing trials posed by predators and adversaries, to a mysterious promised land and a more perfect society.

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess (Nadsat)

 A Clockwork Orange is a dystopian satirical black comedy novel set in a near-future society that has a youth subculture of extreme violence. It follows Alex, a vicious 15 year-old as he and his ‘droogs’ give in to their violent pleasures. Eventually Alex is arrested, charged, and sent for experimental treatment to cure his violent nature…but at what cost?

The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien (Quenya Elvish)

After discovering the true nature of the One Ring, Bilbo Baggins entrusts it to the care of his young cousin, Frodo, who is charged with bringing about its destruction and thus foiling the plans of the Dark Lord. The discovery of the One Ring ignites the great war between good and evil in Middle-earth, as a courageous group of adventurers, led by Frodo, embarks on a perilous quest to destroy the dangerous artifact.

1984 by George Orwell (Newspeak)

Winston Smith wrestles with oppression in Oceania, a place where the Party scrutinizes human actions with ever-watchful Big Brother. Defying a ban on individuality, Winston dares to express his thoughts in a diary and pursues a relationship with Julia. These criminal deeds bring Winston into the eye of the opposition, who then must reform the nonconformist.