Are you looking for a challenge this summer?  Check out our weekly reading lists, inspired by this list from Bookish.  To keep you motivated, we’ll feature one of the categories each week in the e-newsletter along with suggestions from our collection.   Happy Reading!

Dark Harbor House by Tom Demarco

Bring together a wonderfully varied mix of characters in a once-grand Maine island summer cottage, leave them to their own devices over the course of a long, idyllic summer in the late 1940s, and you have all the ingredients for a fine comedy of manners.

Stern Men by Elizabeth Gilbert

On two remote islands off the coast of Maine, the local lobstermen have fought savagely for generations over the fishing rights to the ocean waters between them. Young Ruth Thomas is born into this feud, a daughter of Fort Niles destined to be at war with the men of Courne Haven. Eighteen years old, Ruth returns home from boarding school determined to throw her education overboard and join the “stern men” who work the lobster boats. She is certain of one thing: she will not surrender control of her life to the wealthy Ellis family, which has always had a sinister hold over the island.

No Other Place by John Gould

Recreates life in pre-Revolution New England through the zestful activities of Jabez Knight, his family, and–above all–his daughter, Elzada.

Guest Book by Caroline D. Grimm

A vacation cottage for rent, a strange request to fulfill, a mysterious host, and guests who come with burdened hearts seeking peace. Set in the beauty of Acadia National Park and Mount Desert Island on the stunning coast of Maine.

Bar Harbor Police Beat: True Stories from the Police Files of Mount Desert Island, Maine by Richard Sassaman

Bar Harbor Police Beat describes what the police in a Maine coastal vacation town did over a 10-year period.

A Measure of My Days: The Journal of a Country Doctor by David Loxterkamp

This is the story of one year in the life of a family physician in Belfast, Maine, and his connections not just to that community but to the Human family. In thoughtful, elegiac, often lyrical prose, David Loxterkamp muses about his patients, his colleagues, his family, and his relationship to his Maker as he recalls the daily minutiae that constitute “the bookmarks in a bountiful life, a string of facts and circumstances that have moved beyond the mere documentary” to his discovery of “peace and perspective and companionship along my muddled way.”That way, which is faithfully mapped by journal entries, is populated by the characters he has come to know: the lobstermen, millworkers, church-goers, back-to-the-landers, and “those from away” who share this picturesque, bare-bones, blue-collar piece of Maine coast.