Would you like to fall into a good book?  Check out our weekly reading lists, inspired by this list from Bookish.  To keep you motivated, we’ll feature one of the categories each week in the e-newsletter along with suggestions from our collection.   Happy Reading!

More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are by Elaine Welteroth

In this part-manifesto, part-memoir, Welteroth explores what it means to come into your own on your own terms. Throughout her life, Elaine Welteroth has climbed the ranks of media and fashion, shattering ceilings along the way. In this riveting and timely memoir, the groundbreaking journalist unpacks lessons on race, identity, and success through her own journey, from navigating her way as the unstoppable child of a unlikely interracial marriage in small-town California to finding herself on the frontlines of a modern movement for the next generation of change makers.

A Job You Mostly Won’t Know How to Do: A Novel by Pete Fromm

A taciturn carpenter has been too busy putting the final details on others’ homes to pay much attention to his own fixer-upper. But when his wife becomes pregnant with their first child, he realizes he’ll need to apply his art closer to home. For Taz and Marnie, their dreams are coming into focus, sustained by their deep sense of love and now family. The blueprint for the perfect life eludes Taz, plummeting him head first in the new strange world of fatherhood, of responsibility and late nights and unexpected joy and sorrow. It is a deceptively small novel with a very big heart.

Sting Like a Bee: Muhammad Ali VS. the United States of America 1966-1971

A fascinating chronicle of the five-year period in Muhammad Ali’s life that became a tumultuous turning point–when he joined the Nation of Islam, changed his name, refused military service, was stripped of his boxing license, and stood at the center of an incendiary legal case that gripped the nation. In June 2016, the world mourned Muhammad Ali as a heavyweight champion, a hero, an Olympic gold medalist, and an American icon. Journalist Leigh Montville now presents an intimate portrait of a pivotal five-year span that is far less familiar.

For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics by Donna Brazile

For Colored Girls Who Consider Politics is filled with personal stories that bring to life heroic figures we all know and introduce us to some of those who’ve worked behind the scenes but are still hidden. Whatever their perch, the Colored Girls are always focused on the larger goal of “hurrying history” so that every American — regardless of race, gender or religious background — can have a seat at the table. This is their story.

The Origin of Others by Toni Morrison

America’s foremost novelist reflects on the themes that preoccupy her work and increasingly dominate national and world politics: race, fear, borders, the mass movement of peoples, the desire for belonging. What is race and why does it matter? What motivates the human tendency to construct Others? Why does the presence of Others make us so afraid? Drawing on her Norton Lectures, Toni Morrison takes up these and other vital questions bearing on identity in The Origin of Others.

The Healer’s Daughter by Charlotte Hinger

Bethany Herbert, daughter of a legendary healer, leaves the South for the new black community of Nicodemus, Kansas. Despite the hardships, the community comes to love the prairie. Bethany’s mother, Queen Bess, comes to Nicodemus, as does the handsome lawyer Jed Talbot, who galvanizes the settlers. Bethany resists the call of her heart because Queen Bess warns her the best healers are chaste and single. When the Herbert women’s medical procedures are undermined, Bethany nearly succumbs to Queen Bess’s call for total segregation from the whites Bess hates. Sinister forces come into play through white politicians seeking the black vote, and sabotage by a woman within Nicodemus who yearns for the old color hierarchy.