Are you ready to fall into a good book?  Check out our weekly reading lists, inspired by this list from Bookish.  To keep you motivated, we’ll feature one of the categories each week in the e-newsletter along with suggestions from our collection.   Happy Reading!

Collected Works by Flannery O’Connor (Recommended by Karin Slaughter)

This collection includes all the short stories, both novels, the essays, and sellected letters of one of the most unique and important writers in the southern tradition.

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi (Recommended by Alyson Richman)

On the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. Just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. Kalanithi chronicles his transformation from a naïve medical student into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality.

In the Heart of the Sea by Nathaniel Philbrick (Recommended by Bob Eckstein)

Recounts the story of the 1820 wreck of the whaleship Essex, which inspired Melville’s classic “Moby-Dick,” and describes its doomed crew’s ninety-day attempt to survive whale attacks and the elements on three tiny lifeboats.

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott (Recommended by Sarah Pekkanen)

Here are talented tomboy and author-to-be Jo, tragically frail Beth, beautiful Meg, and romantic, spoiled Amy, united in their devotion to each other and their struggles to survive in New England during the Civil War.

The Heart of the Matter by Graham Greene (Recommended by Jonathan Rabb)

In a British colony in West Africa, Henry Scobie is a pious and righteous man of modest means enlisted with securing borders. But when he’s passed over for a promotion as commissioner of police, the humiliation hits hardest for his wife, Louise. Already oppressed by the appalling climate, frustrated in a loveless marriage, and belittled by the wives of more privileged officers, Louise wants out.

The Phantom Toolbooth by Norton Juster (Recommended by Katie Ganshert)

This fantasy centers around Milo, a bored ten-year-old who comes home to find a large toy tollbooth sitting in his room. Joining forces with a watchdog named Tock, Milo drives through the tollbooth’s gates and begins a memorable journey. He meets such characters as the foolish, yet lovable Humbug, the Mathemagician, and the not-so-wicked “Which,” Faintly Macabre, who gives Milo the “impossible” mission of returning two princesses to the Kingdom of Wisdom.