The Great Derangement Climate Change and the Unthinkable by Amitav Ghosh

Overheated the human cost of climate change by Andrew T. Guzman

In Overheated, Guzman takes climate change out of the realm of scientific abstraction to explore its real-world consequences. He writes not as a scientist, but as an authority on international law and economics.

This Changes Everything Capitalism vs. the climate by Naomi Klein

Klein argues that climate change isn’t just another issue to be neatly filed between taxes and health care. It’s an alarm that calls us to fix an economic system that is already failing us in many ways. Klein … builds the case for how massively reducing our greenhouse emissions is our best chance to simultaneously reduce gaping inequalities, re-imagine our broken democracies, and rebuild our gutted local economies.

Tropic of Chaos Climate Change and the new geography of violence by Christian Parenti

From Africa to Asia and Latin America, the era of climate wars has begun. Extreme weather is breeding banditry, humanitarian crisis, and state failure. In Tropic of Chaos, investigative journalist Christian Parenti travels along the front lines of this gathering catastrophe–the belt of economically and politically battered postcolonial nations and war zones girding the planet’s midlatitudes. Here he finds failed states amid climatic disasters. But he also reveals the unsettling presence of Western military forces and explains how they see an opportunity in the crisis to prepare for open-ended global counterinsurgency. Parenti argues that this incipient “climate fascism”–a political hardening of wealthy states– is bound to fail. The struggling states of the developing world cannot be allowed to collapse, as they will take other nations down as well. Instead, we must work to meet the challenge of climate-driven violence with a very different set of sustainable economic and development policies.

Lyme the first epidemic of Climate Change by Mary Beth Pfeiffer

Being the Change live well and spark a climate revolution by Peter Kalmus

Alarmed by drastic changes in the Earth’s climate systems, the author, a climate scientist and suburban father of two, embarked on a journey to change his life and the world. He began by bicycling, growing food, meditating, and making other simple, fulfilling changes. Ultimately, he slashed his climate impact to under a tenth of the US average and became happier in the process. Being the change explores the connections between our individual daily actions and our collective predicament. It merges science, spirituality, and practical action to develop a satisfying and appropriate response to global warming.

Global Weirdness severe storms deadly heatwaves and relentless drought rising seas and the weather of the future by Climate Central

Explains climate change– its implications for the future, and what we can, and cannot, do to avoid further change.

With Speed and Violence why scientists fear tipping points in climate change by Fred Pearce

Fred Pearce has been writing about climate change for eighteen years, and the more he learns, the worse things look. Where once scientists were concerned about gradual climate change, now more and more of them fear we will soon be dealing with abrupt change resulting from triggering hidden tipping points. Even President Bush”s top climate modeler, Jim Hansen, warned in 2005 that “we are on the precipice of climate system tipping points beyond which there is no redemption.” As Pearce began working on this book, normally cautious scientists beat a path to his door to tell him about their fears and their latest findings. This book tells the stories of these scientists and their work–from the implications of melting permafrost in Siberia and the huge river systems of meltwater beneath the icecaps of Greenland and Antarctica to the effects of the “ocean conveyor” and a rare molecule that runs virtually the entire cleanup system for the planet. Above all, the scientists told him what they”re now learning about the speed and violence of past natural climate change–and what it portends for our future. This is the most up-to-date and readable book yet about the growing evidence for global warming and the large climatic effects it may unleash.

A Warmer World from Polar Bears to butterflies how climate change affects wildlife by Caroline Arnold (Juvenile Non-fiction)

Over the past several decades, our world has been warming at a faster rate than ever before. Winters are shorter. Sea levels have risen. Territories of predators and prey have shifted. To survive in this new environment, animals everywhere have had to adapt, or face extinction. Complemented by Jamie Hogan’s rich collage illustrations, A Warmer World offers young readers a clear-eyed look at the effects of climate change on animals around the world.

The Magic School Bus and the Climate Challenge by Joanna Cole (Juvenile Non-fiction)

Ms. Frizzle introduces her students to scientific facts about global warming, sharing accessible coverage of climate change and ways everyday kids can help to protect the environment.